Chronicles

Chronicle: It is possible to live with cancer

Now in September it is eight months since I was diagnosed with cancer. On a rainy evening when the warm summer is over, I decide it’s time to take a closer look at how things stand. Where am I now, with regard to my cancer and my treatment? How have I coped with what has […]

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Chronicle: Henning Mankell’s third text about his cancer

It is now two months since I was diagnosed with cancer. I am already well into the second series of chemotherapy treatment. Thus far I have been spared any noticeable side-effects. The fact that a battle is taking place inside my body is more of a vague suspicion than a definite feeling. I have many […]

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Chronicle: Henning Mankell’s second text about his cancer

After being diagnosed with cancer at the beginning of January, I endured a 10-day-long descent into hell. I remember that time as a fog, a shattering mental shudder that occasionally transmuted into an imagined fever. Brief, clear moments of despair. And all the resistance my willpower could muster. Looking back, I can now think of […]

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Chronicle: Henning Mankell about his cancer

A couple of weeks ago I travelled to Stockholm to see an orthopedist who had previously treated me. I went there with a diagnosis of a painful slipped disc, hernia, in the neck. When I went back to Gothenburg the following day I did it with a serious diagnosis of cancer. I do not have […]

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Chronicle: Rahel Kassahun has not waited

One evening I walk down to the hotel bar to eat something. The air condition seems to have freaked out. It is so cold in the bar that I do not know whether I should stay or not. I walk around in the bar for a couple of minutes, trying to find a table where […]

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Chronicle: Ruth was more than a maid

In the house where I grew up in Härjedalen there was a maid. Her name was Ruth and she was twenty something when she came to our family. That must have been 1951 or 1952. I was three or four years old. We had moved to Härjedalen from Stockholm. The maid was an emergency solution. […]

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Chronicle: Mankell’s speech at WEF in Davos

Davos, January 2013 Dear friends, Since I have spent my life telling stories about human beings, their lives, their time on earth I would like to begin this session by telling you a story as well. In your imagination I want you to follow me to a country in Southeast Africa where I have lived […]

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Chronicle: Open letter to The World Bank

Sir, In the past decade, an unprecedented scramble by foreign investors for land in developing countries has seen an area the size of London change hands every six days. But scandalously weak regulation has failed to ensure this is done properly, leaving poor communities at risk of having their land grabbed. Land is crucial for […]

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Chronicle: A Swedish love story, lost in translation

Most countries have a few writers who never become known outside their own borders and their own language. Their literary qualities are not questioned in their native countries, but they do not gain the international fame that seems granted. For example, Gore Vidal, the American writer who died last week, is known only in limited […]

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Chronicle: A Horrible Cave

Nobody knows for certain for how long human beings will populate the earth. What we do know is that most living species sooner or later will become extinct. The human being, most likely, will not be an exception. The reason for this is our brutal command over nature and that we are increasingly behaving like […]

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Chronicle: Charles Dickens in Maputo

Charles Dickens was born 200 years ago. He truly belongs to the world literature and his books are read everywhere. His stories also exist as movies, TV series and theatre shows. Everyone is familiar with Oliver Twist and David Copperfield. Charles Dickens was born 200 years ago. He truly belongs to the world literature and […]

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Chronicle: Charles Dickens in Maputo

Charles Dickens was born 200 years ago. He truly belongs to the world literature and his books are read everywhere. His stories also exist as movies, TV series and theatre shows. Everyone is familiar with Oliver Twist and David Copperfield. But Charles Dickens’ books are not historical remnants that have stayed alive due to some […]

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Chronicle: A decision that changed the world

If I were to ask the following question to somebody on the street today I doubt that anyone would know the answer: Do you know who Thomas Clarkson was? I doubt that even the more avid newspaper readers would be sure. Thomas Clarkson could have been an English soccer player or perhaps a gangster in […]

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Chronicle: To read and write – a question of dignity

Some years ago I met, almost on a daily basis, a group of street children – boys only – who were living in the centre of Maputo. They made their living by helping cars finding somewhere to park and then they watched the cars. I imagine that this is a universal way to make a […]

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Chronicle: Why doesn’t Africa help its own people?

Swedish newspapers were recently full of images of politicians holding empty plates in front of themselves saying that they had donated their lunches to those plagued by starvation in the Horn of Africa. The NGO Diakonia initiated this campaign, and there is certainly nothing wrong with that. Who does not want to help? What does […]

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